UB stude awarded Procter & Gamble scholarship

by RONALYN BANAKEN

 

 

UB’s Jiovanni Diaz receives his check from P&G, PAMET, and PASMETH representatives for winning Best in Essay during the

 Handog ng Safeguard MedTechs ng Kinabukasan Scholarship Program Awards Night.

 

 

From 213 finalists nationwide, a Medical Technology student of the University of Baguio (UB) has been awarded a scholarship by Procter & Gamble (P&G) – one of the world’s major consumer products company.


Jiovanni Diaz, a freshman BS Medical Laboratory Science (BMLS) student of the UB School of Natural Sciences (SNS), has qualified for the 2013 Handog ng Safeguard MedTechs ng Kinabukasan scholarship program of the Philippine Association of Medical Technologists (PAMET) and P&G–Philippines through Safeguard.

 

The only finalist from the region, Diaz ranked second among 15 who received the grant at the Peninsula Manila Hotel in Makati on Oct. 25.

 

The scholarship will cover the grantees’ tuition from first year to fourth year. They are also entitled to a book allowance, according to Erlinda Sanchez, BMLS Program Chair.

 

“The amount paid by the scholars for their tuition during the first semester of this school year will be reimbursed by Procter & Gamble,” she added.

 

The 15 scholars were chosen based on their outstanding grades and leadership potentials, among others. Prior to the final ranking, the finalists underwent series of examinations and interviews. “From the 213 applicants, we were screened to just 25, and then to the final 15,” Diaz noted.

 

“We went through rigorous written tests and IQ tests. The panel for the interviews consisted of PAMET, P&G andPASMETH (Philippine Association of Schools of Medical Technology and Public Health) representatives,” he added.  

 

The grantees also wrote an essay in which Diaz’s entry got the nod for Best Essay. “The essay essentially contained how I see my role as a MedTech student in the University [of Baguio]. I also highlighted my leadership capabilities,” Diaz said.

 

Meanwhile, as part of the program contract, the scholars must maintain a grade of at least 80% in all their subjects and must render a two-year service as medical technologist in the country after graduation.

 

Now on its 24th year, the scholarship program aims to “support and promote the [Medical Technology] profession,” advancing the cause of “uplifting public health.”

 

UB has so far produced four grantees, including Diaz, under the said program.

 

“I asked help from Sir Ponciano and of course from the SNS family. But I also had to prepare myself so I did some reading and research,” Diaz said.

 

Mark Alben Ponciano – now a faculty member of UB-SNS – was a grantee in 2006.

 

 

Diaz (third from left) with his co-grantees during the awarding ceremony. Diaz ranked second nationwide, making it to the final 15.

 

 

 

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